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JILP’s Online Forum

JILP’s Online Forum is a place where law students, legal professionals and academics can publish their writing. Online Forum pieces are generally shorter than articles in JILP’s traditional, print publication and provide an opportunity for diverse voices to come together on topics of international law.

Select a title below to be taken to the full piece, or view our entire publication archive here.

  • Promoting Global Democracy: Can and Should the United States Continue to Play a Role?

    An online annotation by Hannah Colter, Staff Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction January 6, 2021 marked a dark and fearful day for global democracy, when the United States faced a coup attempt upon its Capitol. This siege not…

  • Analyzing the Implications of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

    An online annotation by Jack Rogers, Staff Editor PDF version available here. Water is the most vital resource and access to freshwater is essential to the function of a modern state. Beyond access to drinkable water, states also use freshwater…

  • Covid-19: A Reckoning of the Immigration Detention System and a Call for Alternatives to Detention Programs

    An online annotation by Rebecca Niederberger Martinez, Staff Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction: The Covid-19 Pandemic Exposes Immigration Detention Conditions On September 8, 2020, media sources around the world captured the raging flames consuming the Moria refugee camp…

  • Statelessness in the Context of Climate Change: The Applicability of the Montevideo Criteria to “Sinking States”

    An online annotation by Antonio Joseph DelGrande, Senior Online Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction As resource extraction and fossil fuel and greenhouse gas emission continue to fuel global climate change, nearly one billion people continue to live in…

  • Reflections on Nigeria v. Process & Industrial Developments Limited

    Following an unprecedented ruling by an English High Court on an application in the Nigeria v. Process & Industrial Developments Limited (P&ID) case granting Nigeria an extension in time to bring challenges under sections 67 and 68(2)(g) of the English Arbitration Act 1996 (“the 1996 Act”), this article reflects on the implication of the public policy elements of fraud relied on by Nigeria. The article interrogates the reasoning behind the Court’s decision, especially the allegations of fraud in the procurement of the underlying contract – a Gas Supply and Processing Agreement (‘GSPA’). The article also explores themes of economic justice arising from Nigeria’s reliance on fraud as a basis for challenging the arbitration award. Drawing on a recent decision of the Mozambique Constitutional Council over illegally procured commercial loans, the article argues that there are parallels and opportunities for learning between the two cases, especially relating to the role of civil society organisations (CSOs) in holding public officials accountable and exposing fraudulent deals with corrupt foreign officials. The reflection concludes with some thoughts about ongoing debates in Nigeria over whether adopting a national arbitration policy constitutes a viable option for reducing dependence on foreign courts and arbitration tribunals as forums for settling disputes with foreign investors.

  • Corporate Accountability: Prosecuting Corporations for the Commission of International Crimes of Atrocity

    An annotation by Photeine Lambridis, Managing Editor. PDF version available here. I. Introduction The complicity of corporations in international crimes is not a new phenomenon, however multinational corporations are increasingly participating in the direct commission of crimes of atrocity.[1] By…

  • Guantánamo Bay’s Quasi-Colonial Status: From Leasehold to Detention Camp

    An annotation by María Alejandra Torres, Staff Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction Guantánamo Bay is globally known for its military detention center, where the United States has held 780 people since 2002, nine of whom have died in…

  • Infection Rates and Indigenous Rights: The Effects of the COVID-19 Outbreak in the Amazon

    An annotation by Ashley Ravins, Staff Editor PDF version available here. The global outbreak of COVID-19 threatens to exacerbate existing socioeconomic gaps for indigenous communities. Facing financial uncertainty, weakened welfare programs, and limited access to healthcare, many Latin American indigenous…

  • The Role of FDI and the Private Sector in Changing Bolsonaro’s Environmental Policies

    An annotation by Morgan Lucey, Staff Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction  Since taking office, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has enacted policies that favor agriculture and industry over the protection of Brazil’s forests. This policy is rooted in the…

  • Due Diligence and the Limitations of a Positivist Conception of General Principles of Law

    An annotation by Philip Dalgarno, Staff Editor PDF version available here. I. Introduction Among the canonical sources of international law listed in Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, General Principles of Law (GPLs) have long…

  • Catalonia: Potential Sovereignty in the Era of Controversial Self-Determination

    An annotation by Paula Ajumobi, Staff Editor   PDF version available here. I. Introduction              In the past couple of years, Catalonia, an autonomous region of Spain with approximately 7.5 million people,[1]  has come to the forefront of international news because of its…

  • China’s Rule of Law Development: The Increasing Emphasis on Internationalization of Legal Standards and the Horizontal Rule of Law

    PDF Version available here. Martin Kwan* I. Introduction Professor Frank He, in his thought-provoking article “(Non)legality as Governmentality in China,” argues that “China remains far from a rule-based society,” and that the rule of law may not be China’s ultimate goal…

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